Rachel Cohen

  • 2020
    • December
        • 6:00 PM to 7:00 PMPride and Prejudice, Three Tuesdays at the 92nd Street Y, 6 Central / 7 Eastern92nd Street Y

          Please come and read Pride and Prejudice with me at the 92nd Street Y on three Tuesdays this December. The events support the 92nd Street Y, which graciously offers my former students a $20 discount off the regular ticket price by using the code Bennet.

          Course description and ticket purchase here:

          https://www.92y.org/class/reading-austen-s-pride-and-prejudice

          Course Description:

          When Jane Austen got the first copies of Pride and Prejudice, she wrote to her sister “I have got my own darling Child from London.”

          It was January of 1813, a cold season and the Napoleonic Wars were raging. The arrival of Elizabeth Bennet was cheering indeed, “I must confess that I think her as delightful a creature as ever appeared in print.” Austen had worked very hard to achieve the effervescent quickness of the book, and she had learned a lot as she wrote and rewrote. The book itself is also about reading, learning to judge characters, letting an internal voice come through in the world, revising, walking, and reading again, all very much of the moment. In the dark days of December, please join me in discovering, or discovering again, the complex landscape of Pride & Prejudice, Austen’s delightful character, and the wonderful relationships this author and character have to time.

          Class meets Tuesdays, December 1, 8, 15.

          Copies of Pride and Prejudice, as well as Cohen’s Austen Year: A Memoir in Five Novels, can be purchased from bookshop.org.

        • 6:00 PM to 7:00 PMPride and Prejudice, Three Tuesdays at the 92nd Street Y, 6 Central / 7 Eastern92nd Street Y

          Please come and read Pride and Prejudice with me at the 92nd Street Y on three Tuesdays this December. The events support the 92nd Street Y, which graciously offers my former students a $20 discount off the regular ticket price by using the code Bennet.

          Course description and ticket purchase here:

          https://www.92y.org/class/reading-austen-s-pride-and-prejudice

          Course Description:

          When Jane Austen got the first copies of Pride and Prejudice, she wrote to her sister “I have got my own darling Child from London.”

          It was January of 1813, a cold season and the Napoleonic Wars were raging. The arrival of Elizabeth Bennet was cheering indeed, “I must confess that I think her as delightful a creature as ever appeared in print.” Austen had worked very hard to achieve the effervescent quickness of the book, and she had learned a lot as she wrote and rewrote. The book itself is also about reading, learning to judge characters, letting an internal voice come through in the world, revising, walking, and reading again, all very much of the moment. In the dark days of December, please join me in discovering, or discovering again, the complex landscape of Pride & Prejudice, Austen’s delightful character, and the wonderful relationships this author and character have to time.

          Class meets Tuesdays, December 1, 8, 15.

          Copies of Pride and Prejudice, as well as Cohen’s Austen Year: A Memoir in Five Novels, can be purchased from bookshop.org.

        • 6:00 PM to 7:00 PMPride and Prejudice, Three Tuesdays at the 92nd Street Y, 6 Central / 7 Eastern92nd Street Y

          Please come and read Pride and Prejudice with me at the 92nd Street Y on three Tuesdays this December. The events support the 92nd Street Y, which graciously offers my former students a $20 discount off the regular ticket price by using the code Bennet.

          Course description and ticket purchase here:

          https://www.92y.org/class/reading-austen-s-pride-and-prejudice

          Course Description:

          When Jane Austen got the first copies of Pride and Prejudice, she wrote to her sister “I have got my own darling Child from London.”

          It was January of 1813, a cold season and the Napoleonic Wars were raging. The arrival of Elizabeth Bennet was cheering indeed, “I must confess that I think her as delightful a creature as ever appeared in print.” Austen had worked very hard to achieve the effervescent quickness of the book, and she had learned a lot as she wrote and rewrote. The book itself is also about reading, learning to judge characters, letting an internal voice come through in the world, revising, walking, and reading again, all very much of the moment. In the dark days of December, please join me in discovering, or discovering again, the complex landscape of Pride & Prejudice, Austen’s delightful character, and the wonderful relationships this author and character have to time.

          Class meets Tuesdays, December 1, 8, 15.

          Copies of Pride and Prejudice, as well as Cohen’s Austen Year: A Memoir in Five Novels, can be purchased from bookshop.org.